News & Events

Upcoming Webinars

Wednesday, June 20, 2018 - 17:00 to 18:00
The Ethics that Guide Good Clinical Practice in Cancer Clinical Trials
Gayle Jameson, NP
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Join us as Gayle Jameson, NP an investigative researcher from the Honor Health Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center guides us through the recruitment and placement in a clinical trial. She will also talk about compassionate use and the "right to try" legislation, and how it might affect clinical trials, both for the researcher and the patient.

Gayle Jameson is a Nurse Practitioner who has cared for adults living with cancer for nearly 40 years.  She is certified as an Advanced Oncology Nurse (AOCN) and is especially interested in the care of patients with pancreatic cancer, early cancer drug development and symptom management. 

In her role as Associate Investigator at the Oncology Clinical Trials Department, HonorHealth Research Institute in Scottsdale, Arizona, she has been Principal Investigator (PI) on multiple phase I and investigator initiated studies and Sub-investigator on 50+ phase I anti-tumor clinical trials. She has an Adjunct Faculty appointment at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and incorporates translational science in clinical trial designs by working with bench science colleagues at TGEN and as a member of the SU2C Pancreatic Cancer Dream Team. Gayle also was the site Principal Investigator on an international study that led to the approval of Onivyde™ plus 5FU and leucovorin for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. She has presented her work nationally and internationally.  Gayle also specializes in symptom management, working with patients in managing fatigue, cachexia and other problems related to cancer and cancer treatments. Prior to coming to Arizona in 2006, Gayle had various nursing roles at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. 

News and Events

The benefits and disadvantages of family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been argued since it was proposed in 1987. The possibilities of stress for health care providers and increased emotional burden for family members as well as risk of legal claims have been the central argument points.A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in March 2013 found out that family members who watch health care providers perform (CPR) on their loved ones were less likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder. They also experienced less anxiety and depression symptoms. The quality of CPR, the level of CPR performers’ emotional stress, patient survival rate and medico-legal claims were found to be not affected by the presence of family members.This 570-participant study done in France concluded that being present during CPR might help families understand that emergency technicians have done everything possible to save the patient’s life. It might offer family opportunities to say goodbye to their loved ones and help them with the bereavement process. The study was done in the home setting for patients with cardiac arrest. Trials in hospitals, such as emergency rooms and intensive care units, are needed to confirm the results, according to the researchers of the study.

The Goldwater Institute plans to sue over the Medicaid expansion recently approved in Arizona. The story was reported September 12, 2013 in the Arizona Republic.

Five health insurers in Arizona outlined their rates for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Reported September 12, 2013 in the Arizona Republic.

A Pakistani exchange student, in a coma since a November car accident, faces possible deportation next week as his visa expires and the Minnesota hospital caring for him seeks to send him home amid mounting, unpaid medical bills, claims the man’s family.Source: NBC News

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