News & Events

Upcoming Webinars

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 - 16:00 to 17:00
When Uninsured Immigrant Patients Need Long-Term Care: Ethical and Practical Challenges
Nancy Berlinger, PhD
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Nancy Berlinger, PhD will lead us in the exploration of the ethics of medical repatriation, that is, the practice of returning an uninsured, indigent immigrant who needs long-term care to his/her native country. What are the moral duties of our insitutions? What are the moral duties of the patient and/or their families? In some cases, the patient would be covered by insurance in the native country. Does that change the moral claim of the patient? In a previous article, Berlinger lays out all the possible courses of action, using a realistic case study of an injured construction worker who is undocumented and who could benefit from appropriate rehabilitative care.

Dr. Berlinger is a Research Scholar at The Hastings Center, an independent, nonpartisan, and nonprofit bioethics research institute founded in 1969 and located in Garrison, New York. Her interests include health care ethics and social ethics in aging societies; health care access for migrants; the management of safety and harm in health care systems, and problems at the intersection of these issues. Berlinger directed the research project that produced a revised and expanded edition of the landmark Hastings Center Guidelines for Decisions on Life-Sustaining Treatment and Care Near the End of Life (OUP, 2013). She is also the author of Are Workarounds Ethical? Managing Moral Problems in Health Care Systems (OUP, 2016) and After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness (Johns Hopkins, 2005). 

Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 16:00 to 17:00
Recent Updates in the Law: Public Health and Government Regulation of Behavior
Valerie Gutmann Koch, JD
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Join us as Valerie Gutmann Koch highlights recent updates in the law where public health officials and the government have taken steps to regulate behavior. A recent law in Arizona regarding the ownership of embryos is just one of the laws on this list.

Valerie Gutmann Koch is a Visiting Fellow at DePaul University College of Law and the Director of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago’s MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Professor Koch earned her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School, where she was the co-editor of the recent developments section of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics. Professor Koch iserves as the Chair of the ABA’s Special Committee on Bioethics and the Law and Co-Chair of the Law Affinity Group for the American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 16:00 to 17:00
Human research: What can we believe? How do we protect subjects? Reflections of a journal editor and former research subject participant.
David Sklar, MD
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Dr. David Sklar is editor of Academic Medicine and an emergency physician. He does research in health services and health professions education. He's former chair of emergency medicine and associate dean of graduate medical education at the University of New Mexico. He's a professor at Arizona State University in the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery and senior advisor to the university provost in health policy and health professions education and author of the book Atlas of Men.

Dr. Sklar asks that you please read Atlas of Men prior to session, if possible, as he will refer to it in his presentation. 

He will be discussing the following:

  • Ethics and research
  • History of human subjects protection
  • The use of expert review of research including decisions about publications and what we can do to publish more replicable and useful research

News and Events

The benefits and disadvantages of family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been argued since it was proposed in 1987. The possibilities of stress for health care providers and increased emotional burden for family members as well as risk of legal claims have been the central argument points.A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in March 2013 found out that family members who watch health care providers perform (CPR) on their loved ones were less likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder. They also experienced less anxiety and depression symptoms. The quality of CPR, the level of CPR performers’ emotional stress, patient survival rate and medico-legal claims were found to be not affected by the presence of family members.This 570-participant study done in France concluded that being present during CPR might help families understand that emergency technicians have done everything possible to save the patient’s life. It might offer family opportunities to say goodbye to their loved ones and help them with the bereavement process. The study was done in the home setting for patients with cardiac arrest. Trials in hospitals, such as emergency rooms and intensive care units, are needed to confirm the results, according to the researchers of the study.

The Goldwater Institute plans to sue over the Medicaid expansion recently approved in Arizona. The story was reported September 12, 2013 in the Arizona Republic.

Five health insurers in Arizona outlined their rates for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act. Reported September 12, 2013 in the Arizona Republic.

A Pakistani exchange student, in a coma since a November car accident, faces possible deportation next week as his visa expires and the Minnesota hospital caring for him seeks to send him home amid mounting, unpaid medical bills, claims the man’s family.Source: NBC News

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