News & Events

Upcoming Webinars


Wednesday Jul 17th, 2019—4:00pm to 5:00pm
Human research: What can we believe? How do we protect subjects? Reflections of a journal editor and former research subject participant.
David Sklar, MD
Register now

Dr. David Sklar is editor of Academic Medicine and an emergency physician. He does research in health services and health professions education. He's former chair of emergency medicine and associate dean of graduate medical education at the University of New Mexico. He's a professor at Arizona State University in the School for the Science of Health Care Delivery and senior advisor to the university provost in health policy and health professions education and author of the book Atlas of Men.

Dr. Sklar asks that you please read Atlas of Men prior to session, if possible, as he will refer to it in his presentation. He will be discussing the following:

  • Ethics and research
  • History of human subjects protection
  • The use of expert review of research including decisions about publications and what we can do to publish more replicable and useful research

Wednesday Aug 21st, 2019—4:00pm to 5:00pm
Sex and gender: Binaries or bimodal?
Melissa Wilson, PhD
Register now

Understanding sex as a biological variable (SABV) is now considered one of the top priorities of the National Institutes of Health, spanning all institutes. This is because for most of clinical genetics, only one sex was studied, and now drugs, treatments, and therapies are failing at higher proportions in the unstudied (or understudied) sex, typically women. Layering on top of this, is the recognition that sex chromosomes, reproductive hormones, and gender identity all play unique rolls in both how disease manifests, and how patients are treated. Dr. Wilson leads the discussion on sex and gender in human health. 

Melissa Wilson, PhD is a computational evolutionary biologist whose main research interests include sex-biased biology. She studies the evolution of sex chromosomes (X and Y in mammals), why mutation rates differ between males and females, and how changes in population history affect the sex chromosomes differently than the non-sex chromosomes. Generally she studies mammals and regularly engages the public in discussions about the difference between sex and gender, the importance (or not) of genetic inheritance, and understanding evolution.

Dr. Wilson is one of the authors of the recently published article: "The Pregnancy Pickle: Evolved Immune Compensation Due to Pregnancy Underlies Sex Differences in Human Diseases"