News & Events

Upcoming Webinars


Wednesday Aug 19th, 2020—4:00pm
Duty to Treat
Patricia Bayless, MD, FACEP, MIHM
Register now

Patricia Bayless, MD, FACEP, MIHM, discusses the "Duty to Treat" which health professionals promise under the social contract.  The social contract is generally defined as an implicit agreement in which society has granted certain privileges (such as status, financial reward, and self-regulation,) to professionals, and in return for those privileges expects the individuals providing health care in all capacities to be competent, moral, and altruistic and also expects them to treat the medical needs of individual patients. Dr. Bayless discusses the duty to treat as one of the principle tenets of professionalism. She also discusses how duty to treat applies in a pandemic.

Dr. Bayless is Chairman of the Board of Arizona Bioethics Network, is an Emergency Medicine Physician with District Medical Group, Valleywise Health Medical Center, a Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at University of Arizona, College of Medicine-Phoenix and Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Creighton University School of Medicine.


Friday Sep 18th, 2020 to Saturday Sep 19th, 2020—9:00am to 12:00pm
ABN 9th Annual Conference
See Agenda
Details coming soon

The COVID-19 pandemic has identified ethical and legal challenges that arise when a health care system is stretched to its limits in providing care to those affected by the pandemic. Health professionals, attorneys, social workers, and the general public have faced these challenges. How does a pandemic triage plan get developed and adopted by a state in the midst of a pandemic? What is the algorithm health care professionals can use to assess provision of care? How can social workers and clinicians prepare and support families of patients? Who is vulnerable? Who is served? What is the responsibility for health care for incarcerated persons, Native persons, and homeless persons? What are the ethical challenges in dealing with long-term care for patients who have a slow recovery? What legal challenges arise when dealing with end of life care in a pandemic? Are our health care professionals safe?

We've invited professionals who have been working tirelessly to address these questions. This is a virtual conference, over two mornings, with an optional post-morning session discussion period each day. We've applied for 5 CEUs: CME, CNE, or ACE. Full agenda is available here.  Registration will be available soon!

News and Events


Highlights: 4th Annual Conference


The Fourth Annual Conference of the Arizona Bioethics Network (ABN) took place on April 11, 2014 at the Scottsdale Resort and Conference Center in Tempe, AZ. Approximately 70 members of  ABN were in attendance. The theme of the conference was "Courage and Compassion in Healthcare".
Images:
Francoise Baylis, Group Discussion, Barbara Fargotstein

Should Arizonans have the right to die with dignity?


Did you miss this?  Watch the recording here!  Should Arizonans have the right to die with dignity?" is an informative event centered around a moderated panel discussion. The panel will consist of ethics experts on both sides of the aid in dying issue, and is designed to thoughtfully address each side of this often fiercely debated topic. Two of these experts include Courtney Campbell, Professor of Ethics, Science, and the Environment in the Department of Philosophy at Oregon State University and Helene Starks, Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical History and Ethics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. In addition to the panel's exploration, graduate students from ASU's Applied Ethics and the Professions-Biomedical and Health Ethics program will provide additional information to assist participants in better understanding the landscape of assisted dying in the states in which it is legal, as well as possibilities that have been proposed for Arizona specifically.    

Newly Reported 1942 Nutrition Trial


Food historian, Ian Mosby, reports that he has uncovered a nutrition study on Canadian aboriginal children beginning in 1942. Read more

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