Blogs

  • The movie, "Our Father" explores the life of Dr. Donald Cline, an infertility specialist who is now known to have used his sperm to inseminate his patients. The patients did not give consent to his use of his own sperm. Many had brought in their husband's sperm to be used. If their husband was infertile, the women thought that medical residents from the nearby hospitals were the contributors. Now, thanks to DNA research, 94 persons have been determined to be half-siblings because they were conceived with Dr. Cline's sperm. The 94 half-siblings were located in a 25 mile radius of each other, leading them to worry about possibly dating or procreating unkowingly with a half-sibling. While prolific, Dr. Cline is not the only physican accused to using his sperm for these procedures. When the half-siblings discovered each other, they also learned that there were no laws on the books to charge Dr. Cline with a crime. The women had consented to be inseminated, but did not give their informed consent to the sperm that was used.

    What policies can or should be put into place to prevent this from happening again? How can child conceived from artificial insemination protect themselves from unknowingly becoming involved with a half-sibling? Should their be a database for such DNA?

     

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  • Otuska's Abilify MyCite, the first FDA-approved pill that notifies physicians when the pill is consumed, is being rolled out to Medicaid patients in Florida. The pill costs approximately $1650/month. Bioethicists weighed in on the ethics of measuring compliance, and ultimately FDA approved the pill. What do you think? Is the public health threat of schizophrenia a greater concern than patient autonomy? Does the fact that it is going to Medicaid patients only in this first rollout modify your reasoning?

     

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  • We've had two webinars recently on conscience objection related to the new HHS regulations protecting them. There have been two instances in Arizona recently where a pharmacist has refused to provide the medication prescribed to a patient. One script was for the "morning-after" pill, while the other was for hormone therapy for a person transitioning. Do you think the pharmacist(s) had the right to refuse to provide the medication?

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  • The Arizona Department of Health and Human Services has broadcast some information and insights into opioids in Arizona in light of the Arizona Opioid Epidemic Act, most of which goes into effect in 2019. Dr. Christ, director of AZDHS, details the aspects of the law currently in effect. Read about it here. We'd love to hear from you. Has your practice changed either because of the law or because of the information regarding opioids? If you are a patient currently receiving opioids for pain management, have you seen changes from your physicians regarding your treatment? We'll have a full workshop on this topic on August 17 in Flagstaff. Join us there!

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  • In May 2016 in response to a class-action lawsuit that protested the poor health care of Arizona's prisoners, a federal judge ordered the State of Arizona to meet settlement requirements for deadlines for providing medication and having prisoners seen by health providers. Arizona recently admitted that it had 1900 instances of non-compliance in December and January alone. The US Magistrate David Duncan ordered the Arizona Department of Corrections Director to to appear at a hearing Tuesday was called after "U.S. Magistrate David Duncan repeatedly voiced frustration over what he called Arizona's "abject failure" to make the improvements it promised when it settled a class-action lawsuit over the quality of health care for inmates."

    What do you think can be done to improve health provision to Arizona inmates? Have you treated inmates at your facilities?

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  • Research explores the high cost of getting sick, and finds that lost wages cause long-lasting impact on the financial security of the patient. Have you experienced a similar crisis? Were you able to take advantage of FMLA to offset your lost wages? 

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  • Recently, the new agencies have reported that hospitals are facing a shortage of opioids. Now here is an article reporting that an International Human Rights organization  will investigate the treatment of chronic pain in the US. Do you think the opioid epidemic and opioid shortage will affect you or your practice?

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  • Sue Ellen Allen, a local activist, hands out pillows to Arizona lawmakers to highlight the difficulties women face in Arizona prisons/jails with receiving health care and health products. The pillows were made of femine hygiene products because until recently women held in confinement in Arizona were allowed only twelve pads a month for menstrual cycles and tampons had to be purchased from the central supply. What are your thoughts on healthcare for Arizona inmates?

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  • The Arizona Republic and KJZZ have jointly reported on claims that Corizon Correctional Center has refused medical care to patients to avoid fines for non-compliance with judge's order. Have you had any experience as a health care provider with patients brought to you from the prison system? https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2018/02/27/arizona-ju...

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  • STAT News reported in January that the basis for the disparity in maternal health rates is racism. What do you think?  

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