News & Events

Upcoming Events

Movie Screening: In a Different Key

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm (MST/Arizona) 

ABN, with support of First Place AZ and Dignity Health, will be hosting a free screening of the movie In A Different Key followed by a Q&A with the film’s creators. This an intimate documentary that will explore autism and the struggles to belong; as a mother tracks down the first person diagnosed with autism. Join us as we watch her journey through cruelty and kindness as she searches for hope for future generations to experience greater acceptance.

Timeline:
5:00 pm Registration, Food & Networking
5:45 pm Movie Screening Begins
7:45 pm Q&A

Location details:
St. Joseph’s Medical Campus
Goldman Auditorium
350 W Thomas Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85013

  • Masks are required
  • Parking is available ($1)

Register

The State of Pharmaceutical Shortages

Summer Peregrin, PharmD

Recent shortages of pharmaceuticals have caused physicians, pharmacists, and patients to make tough decisions. Dr. Summer Peregrin leads us in a discussion of the effects of drug shortages on patient care from the perspective of the hospital pharmacist.

Dr. Peregrin is a clinical pharmacist with Dignity Health and has previously taught at the School of Pharmacy at University of Arizona, Creighton, and Midwestern University.

Registration Closed

Immigration Policies and the Effect on Immigrant Health

Gregory Rogel, MA

Details Coming Soon

Upcoming Webinars

Bioethics in Neurosurgery: More than Informed Consent

Margot Kelly-Hedrick and Sasha White

There are many ethical issues that can arise when a patient is referred to a neurosurgeon. Beyond informed consent, how does the neurosurgeon recognize these issues and respond to them? Ethical issues can arise in the clinic, during a scheduled operation, or in the trauma bay of the emergency department. How does one deliver care in an equitable and just way? What are the ethical challenges in recruiting a patient for research? Who are the stakeholders in neurosurgical care and how can they work together?

Register

In support of improving patient care, this activity has been planned and implemented by Arizona State University and Arizona Bioethics Network. Arizona State University is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

As a Jointly Accredited Organization, Arizona State University is approved to offer social work continuing education by the Association of Social Work Board’s (ASWB) Approved Continuing Education (ACE) program. Organizations, not individual courses, are approved under this program. State and provincial regulatory boards have the final authority to determine whether an individual course may be accepted for continuing education credit. Arizona State University maintains responsibility for this course. Social Workers completing this course receive 1 credit hour of continuing education credits per individual session.

This activity was planned by and for the healthcare team, and learners will receive 1 Interprofessional Continuing Education (IPCE) credit for learning and change.

Twitter Feed

Two words health care providers don't want to hear: ethical dilemma. Here's a case study about a patient named "Patti" and how we, family and physicians worked together on behalf of a woman with no advance directive. https://bit.ly/3ie7i5w
#bioethics

The January 2023 issue of the #AMAJournalofEthics – Segregation in Health Care – is live!

This theme issue investigates a clear health justice demand to definitively end continued normalization of structural racism: http://spr.ly/60123JJTm

Join @ for our first webinar of the year. The January webinar examines the ethical concerns in Neurosurgery and looks to go beyond the topic of informed consent. We hope you can join us! #ABN #monthlywebinar #neurosurgery #bioethics
Registration: https://atsu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMrc-yorD4qHNW5sHktapfW5QhsvFvQ7lyI

Register today for our first webinar of 2023! - https://mailchi.mp/0b8e4873f94f/register-today-for-our-first-webinar-of-2023

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Wednesday Jan. 19th, 2022 – 4:00PM MST

Implications of the Approval of Aduhelm for the Stewardship of Public Trust

Lauren Sankary, JD, MA

Implications of the Approval of Aduhelm for the Stewardship of Public Trust

Lauren Sankary, JD, MA

On June 7, 2021, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved aducanumab (Aduhelm; Biogen Inc), the first new drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease in 2 decades. The approval of the drug, however, by FDA has not been without controversy and therefore, ethical challenges, as there are questions about its value. Lauren Sankary, JD, shares with us some of the ethical challenges that arise with this drug, and the state of FDA approvals.

Lauren Sankary is Associate Director of the Neuroethics Program, and Clinical Ethicist at Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute, Department of Bioethics.

Wednesday Feb. 16th, 2022 – 4:00PM MST

The Ins and Outs of Managing an Incarcerated Patient in the Hospital

Marc Stern, MD

The Ins and Outs of Managing an Incarcerated Patient in the Hospital

Marc Stern, MD

It can be challenging managing a patient in the hospital who is under guard by jail or prison officers. This webinar will address the common challenging questions that arise, such as: What are their rights with regard to medical decision-making? What do you do with a patient who lacks decision-making capacity? If a patient is a ward of the state, who calls the shots? Is the prison warden the “next of kin”? How does one interact with the officers who stand guard over the patients? What can they know about the patient’s condition? Does HIPAA apply to these patients? What is the standard of care for an incarcerated patient? Should I force feed a patient sent from the jail because they’re on hunger strike?

Dr. Marc Stern was previously the chief medical officer of the correctional facilities for the state of Washington. When the Washington began using lethal injection as its capital punishment, Dr. Stern resigned his position because of the use of his office for the procurement of the pharmaceuticals. Marc Stern received the B.S. degree from the University of Albany in 1975, and the M.D. degree from the University of Buffalo in 1982. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine, and obtained an MPH from Indiana University School of Public Health in 1992. He is currently an assistant professor at U. Washington, School of Public Health. He is also a member of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care and has published extensively on that subject in NEJM, Journal of Nephrology, Annals of Internal Medicine, and the American Journal of Public Health. He is on the editorial boards of the International Journal of Prison Health and the Journal of Correctional Health Care.

Past Webinars

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Kelvin Black, PhD
Arizona State University
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Zasha Swan, JD
Harvard University
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Frank Jones, MD
Midwestern University
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Jack Brownn, PhD
Cambridge University